Events
Events
2019
The 1st SPARC Japan Seminar 2019
"Open Science in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Putting it into Practice"
Date&Time October 24, 2019 / 13:30-17:00
Place National Institute of Informatics, 12F 1208 & 1210 Conference Room

You can watch sessions on YouTube Live with only speakers' original voices and join us on Twitter.

Please register here to participate in the sessions at the venue and find more infomation on the Japanese page.

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Outline
In recent years, Open Science has been required in all academic fields. Also, in the humanities and social sciences fields, openness will become increasingly important in the future. At past SPARC Japan seminars, we have been focusing on humanities and social sciences. This year, we will focus on initiatives that have already been implemented in open research activities.

The following lectures will be given at this seminar:

- Dr. Ogiso (National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics) will talk about the construction of basic data in the field of linguistics and the research activities using it.

- Dr. Kano (Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo) will lecture on “Minna de Honkoku” (みんなで翻刻), which is research infrastructure for Citizen Science aiming to create new research data in collaboration with researchers and citizens.

- Dr. Ono (Institute for Information Management and Communication, Kyoto University) will discuss URA (University Research Administrator) as an intermediary between researcher data building and Citizen Science

Through these lectures, we will share information to try to develop broad and stable Open Science in the humanities and social sciences fields. People tend to think that Open Science is only relevant to researchers. However, at this seminar, many people, including librarians, university staff, and publishers, will think about practice of Open Science from their respective positions.
Program
Moderator:Misa Nakamura (University of Tokyo Library System)
Time

Title

Speaker

13:30-13:35

Opening Greeting

Chikahiko Suzuki
(Center for Open Data in the Humanities / National Institute of Informatics)

13:35-14:15

NINJAL's Language Resources and Open Data

Toshinobu Ogiso
(National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics)

14:15-14:55

”Minna de Honkoku” and public involvement in historical earthquake studies

Yasuyuki Kano
(Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo/Collaborative Research Organization for Historical Materials on Earthquakes and Volcanoes)

14:55-15:35

What universities can do for citizen-participatory researches in open science

Eiri Ono
(Institute for Information Management and Communication (IIMC), Kyoto University)

15:35-15:55

Break

15:55-16:55

Panel Discussion

[[ Moderator ]]
*Chikahiko Suzuki
(Center for Open Data in the Humanities / National Institute of Informatics)

[[ Panelist ]]
*Toshinobu Ogiso
(National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics)

*Yasuyuki Kano
(Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo/Collaborative Research Organization for Historical Materials on Earthquakes and Volcanoes)

*Eiri Ono
(Institute for Information Management and Communication (IIMC), Kyoto University)

*Misa Nakamura
(University of Tokyo Library System)

16:55-17:00

Closing

Hideaki Takeda
(National Institute of Informatics)

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Speaker
Toshinobu Ogiso (Professor, Language Change Division, National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics)

He completed the master's course at the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, the University of Tokyo. He received his Ph.D. (engineering) from the Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Nara Institute of Science and Technology. After working as a lecturer at Meikai University and as a researcher in the national institute for Japanese Language, an independent administrative agency, he assumed his current position in 2017. He is a councilor of the Society for Japanese Linguistics. His specialties are Japanese Linguistics, Corpus Linguistics, and Natural Language Processing. His background is the study of the history of the Japanese language, and he conducts research using Japanese corpora. He was involved in the development of the corpus at NINJAL, and while he was working at the institute, he majored in natural language processing at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology. At present, he is working as a leader of the project to construct the Corpus of Historical Japanese which enables the diachronic research of the Japanese language.

Yasuyuki Kano (Associate Professor, Earthquake Prediction Research Center, Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo/Collaborative Research Organization for Historical Materials on Earthquakes and Volcanoes)

Yasuyuki Kano is Associate Professor of Earthquake Research institute, The University of Tokyo. He is also appointed to Collaborative Research Organization for Historical Materials on Earthquakes and Volcanoes, The University of Tokyo. He received his PhD from Kyoto University in Earth and Planetary Science. He did his postdoctoral work was previously Assistant Professor at Disaster prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University. He moved to Tokyo in 2018. His current research focuses on historical earthquake and disaster.

Eiri Ono (Program-Specific Senior Lecturer, IT Planning Office, Institute for Information Management and Communication (IIMC), Kyoto University)

While Eiri Ono completed his doctoral degree in Primatology, he also experienced designing academic websites. Since 2015, he joined Center for Enhancing Next Generation Research in Kyoto University and worked as an University Research Administrator to support for young researchers. He started to organize KYOTO Open Science Community and to study citizen-participatory research projects. He joined Institute for Information Management and Communication in Kyoto University since 2018. He manages web-based public relations and gives some lectures on designing academic information.

Chikahiko Suzuki (Center for Open Data in the Humanities / National Institute of Informatics)

A Member of the SPARC Japan Seminar 2019 plannning working group. A Project Researcher at the Center for Open Data in the Humanities (CODH) and National Institute of Informatics. After studying Art History, Cultural Resources Studies and Digital Humanities, his main research interest is in applying informatics and open data to humanities research fields. Currently, he is focusing on IIIF (international image interoperability framework).
https://researchmap.jp/chsuzuki/?lang=english

Misa Nakamura (University of Tokyo Library System)

Librarian of the Section of Planning and Liaison, General Affairs Division at University of Tokyo Library System since April 2017. She is in charge of the general affairs of the library, and building the digital archives of University of Tokyo Library System.

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Abstract
"NINJAL's Language Resources and Open Data"
(Toshinobu Ogiso)

The National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguisitics (NINJAL) builds, owns, and publishes various language resources such as corpora, computerized dictionaries, language maps, dialect survey data, and sound sources. In the open science trend, NINJAL plans to release these resources as open data so that they can be used not only by researchers but also by the general public. However, there are some problems in opening language resources like corpora. One of them is that the corpora cannot be opened easily from the viewpoint of securing self-income. Corpora are in-house manufactured products at high cost, and there is strong demand from IT companies. How should we balance between securing self-income required to research institutions today, maintaining in-house data that will lead to the significance of the research institute, and disclosing research resources widely as open data? I would like to introduce the current state of the NINJAL's efforts and raise issues.

”Minna de Honkoku” and public involvement in historical earthquake studies
(Yasuyuki Kano)

“Minna de Honkoku” (https://honkoku.org/) is an online citizen science project to transcribe historical materials written in Kuzushi-ji or cursive Japanese script. “Minna de Honkoku” Since the release of the project in 2017, over 4000 people registered for the project. Transcription of earthquake-related historical materials owned and digitalized by Earthquake Research Institute Library, the University of Tokyo has been almost completed. The system is updated in 2019 to transcribe wide variety of historical materials with less effort. “Minna de Honkoku” is designed to promote participation by, for example, providing learning and fun, which is essential for engagement of non-professionals to historical Earthquake Studies.

What universities can do for citizen-participatory researches in open science
(Eiri Ono)

Currently, open science is progressing as seen in the transformation of academic information infrastructure such as open access and open data. In the context of open science, various citizen-participatory research projects are also being conducted. In the US, an online platform that includes multiple projects has been created, and the environment is relatively well developed. On the other hand, in Japan, project management often depends on the individual efforts of researchers. In this presentation, I would like to discuass about what universities can do for citizen-participatory research projects in Japan. In particular, I would like to consider the role of players who maintain and support research environments such as URA, museum staff, and librarians.

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Last Updated: 2019/10/15