Events
Events
2016
 
The 3rd SPARC Japan Seminar 2016
"Future Standard Infrastructure Supporting Creation of Scientific Knowledge: Reconsidering Open Science"
Date&Time February 14, 2017 / 10:30-17:20
Place National Institute of Informatics, 12F 1208 & 1210 Conference Room

The event was held on February 14, 2017. 118 people participated.

Please see videos. Slides are available only on Japanese version page.
Documents and SPARC Japan NewsLetter will be published soon.

Outline
The theme of SPARC Japan Seminars throughout the year 2016 is “Articles and Data Distribution in the Trend “Open Science” – Future Standard Infrastructure Supporting Creation of Scientific Knowledge”. On this theme, in the 1st SPARC Japan Seminar 2016 “Roads to Open Access for Japan”, we discussed the relation between the green OA and the gold OA and their roles. In conclusion, we recognized that we should grasp the amounts of APC (article processing charge) which researchers in Japan pay and develop the SCOAP3 model.

In the 2nd SPARC Japan Seminar 2016 (Open Access Summit 2016) "Promoting Openness of Research Data: Incentive and Data Management", we studied how we could provide incentives for researchers, such as data citation, data journals, and data ownership. Moreover we discussed specific measures of research data management to support the system of these incentives, such as the balance between costs and gains to open research data and rewards for research data management, and so on.

Based on the examination above, we will summarize the whole seminars this year. We try to think over new standard infrastructure supporting creation of scientific knowledge beyond “Open Science”, reconsidering it multidirectionally: something that has to be done, should be done, could be done for profits, and cannot avoid being done.

* standard infrastructure: infrastructure supporting academic research (creating scientific knowledge) is made through bottom-up activities in many cases on the constructing process, and it is eventually placed as environment of academic research by users unconsciously. This process is just occurring at Internet scale and activities to establish standards of scholarly environment are born over the borders of regions and scientific fields. In this seminar we define the standard which is given through these activities as “standard infrastructure”.
Program
Moderator:Shigetoshi Kajiwara (Hokkaido University Library)
Time

Title

Speaker

Video

10:30-10:35

Opening Greeting / Outline

Shigetoshi Kajiwara
(Hokkaido University Library)

video

(4:09)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

10:35-11:35

Open Science in a European Perspective

[Abstract]

Ron Dekker
(European Commission (DG Research & Innovation))

video

(1:04:31)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

11:35-12:15

Deep Learning and Open Science – Extreme Speed-up of Scientific Research Triggers Shift Toward Friction-Less Information Distribution

[Abstract]

Asanobu Kitamoto
(National Institute of Informatics / CODH)

video

(40:49)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

12:15-13:15

Break

13:15-13:45

JST's Activity on the Promotion of the Open Science

[Abstract]

Yasushi Ogasaka
(Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST))

video

(30:03)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

13:45-14:15

Using Data Licensing in Materials Science - a Library Viewpoint

[Abstract]

Chie Onodera
(National Institute for Materials Science)

video

(29:50)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

14:15-14:25

Break

14:25-14:55

Idea, Reality and Feasibility of Research Data Sharing: the Survey on Earth Environmental Research Infrastructure

[Abstract]

Masafumi Ono
(Earth Observation Data Integration & Fusion Research Initiative (EDITORIA), the University of Tokyo)

video

(31:15)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

14:55-15:45

Survey and Planning of Information Services on Research Data

 Group A: Planning of the "Institutional Research Information Integrated System (IRIIS)"
 Group B: Planning of the "Open Data Enhancing Network System - ODEN"

[Abstract]

Ikki Ohmukai
(National Institute of Informatics)

Participants in the workshop hosted by NII
Shunichi Tamura
(Shiga University of Medical Science Library)
Shigetoshi Kajiwara
(Hokkaido University Library)

video

(43:24)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

15:45-15:55

Introduction to the RDM Training Tool Developed by the RDM Task Force of Institutional Repository Committee of Japan

[Abstract]

Koichi Ojiro
(The University of Tokyo Library System)

video

(12:14)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

15:55-16:15

Break

16:15-17:15

Panel Discussion:
Future Standard Infrastructure Supporting Creation of Scientific Knowledge

[[ Moderator ]]
*Kazuhiro Hayashi
(National Institute of Science and Technology Policy)

[[ Panelist ]]
*Ron Dekker
(European Commission (DG Research & Innovation))
*Asanobu Kitamoto
(National Institute of Informatics / CODH)
*Yasushi Ogasaka
(Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST))
*Chie Onodera
(National Institute for Materials Science)
*Masafumi Ono
(Earth Observation Data Integration & Fusion Research Initiative (EDITORIA), the University of Tokyo)
*Ikki Ohmukai
(National Institute of Informatics)

video

(1:07:33)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

17:15-17:20

Closing

Jun Adachi
(National Institute of Informatics)

video

(4:29)

video
YouTube


Creative Commons License

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Speaker
Ron Dekker (European Commission (DG Research & Innovation))

Ron Dekker studied econometrics and started his career in labour market research at Maastricht University. In 1995 he moved to Tilburg University where his research focus shifted to data management. The latter was his starting point at the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO): in 1997 he became the head of the Data Agency. Later he worked as a team coordinator at the Social Sciences Division and at the Central Programmes and Institutes Department. In 2007 he was appointed Director Institutes of NWO.
In 2013 he was seconded to SURF, the Dutch IT-innovation organization for Higher Education & Research, as acting director and in 2014 he was seconded to the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture as project leader Open Science in preparation for the Dutch EU Presidency. As of 2016 he is Seconded National Expert on Open Science at the European Commission, Directorate-General Research & Innovation. In March 2017 he will start as the Director of CESSDA, the Consortium of European Social Science Data Archives. CESSDA is one of the large infrastructures in Europa (a so-called ESFRI Landmark) and has its main office in Bergen, Norway.

Asanobu Kitamoto (National Institute of Informatics / CODH)

Dr. Asanobu KITAMOTO earned Ph.D. in Engineering from University of Tokyo in 1997. He is now associate professor of National Institute of Informatics (NII), and also the director of Pre-Center for Open Data in the Humanities (CODH) in Research Organization of Information and Systems (ROIS). He started his research in the field of image data analysis, and later extended his research to data-driven science for humanities, earth science and disaster mitigation. He is also interested in open science and trans-disciplinary collaboration.

Yasushi Ogasaka (Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST))

Dr. Ogasaka graduated from Gakushuin University, Tokyo, Japan and received PhD. in physics. His research area was high energy astrophysics and development of X-ray telescopes. After his experience as Research Fellow at NASA/GSFC and Nagoya University, he was appointed as Assistant Professor of Department of Physics, Nagoya University in 2000. He joined JST in January 2009. He has been working on the management of several public funding programs such as Strategic Basic Research Programs, Technology Transfer Program and so on. Since Oct. 2015, he has been in charge of information services such as journal platform (J-STAGE) or researcher database (researchmap) as Director of Department of Databases for Information and Knowledge Infrastructure.

Chie Onodera (National Institute for Materials Science)

Chie Onodera is a librarian at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS). She had previously worked at university libraries. She is in charge of general library operations including communication of research information.

Masafumi Ono (Earth Observation Data Integration & Fusion Research Initiative (EDITORIA), the University of Tokyo)

Masafumi Ono is a project researcher of Earth Observation Data Integration & Fusion Research Initiative (EDITORIA), the University of Tokyo. Currently, Ono works in the project of "Program of developing the earth environmental information platform". Previously, he has taken part in a working group of ISO/TC211 geographic information standards, task teams of GEO (Group on Earth Observations) or a work package of Belmont Forum E-Infrastructures and Data Management Collaborative Research Action.

Ikki Ohmukai (National Institute of Informatics)

Ikki Ohmukai received his Ph.D. degree in informatics from the Graduate University for Advanced Studies in 2005. He joined National Institute of Informatics in 2005 and has been an associate professor since 2009. His research interests are the semantic web, social media and open data.

Shunichi Tamura (Shiga University of Medical Science Library)

In 2013, he started his career at Shiga University of Medical Science Library as a librarian. He takes charge of book accession and managing the institutional repository. JMLA Health Sciences Information Professional, Basic. A participant of the workshop of academic information system held by NII in 2016.

Koichi Ojiro (The University of Tokyo Library System)

General Manager, the University of Tokyo Library System from April 2015. He started his career as a librarian at the Nagoya University Library in January 1983 and has worked for Tokyo Institute of Technology Library, National Diet Library, Chiba University Libraries, National Institute of Informatics, and the University of Tokyo Library System.

Kazuhiro Hayashi (National Institute of Science and Technology Policy,)

He has been in Scholarly publishing, in a wide variety of roles, for more than 20 years. At Chemical Society of Japan, he has worked successively as an Editor, a Production Manager, an E-journal Manager, and a Promotions Manager. Covering a broad range of roles in publishing, he is focused on scholarly communication through E-journals, and he has reconstructed and improved the way publishing is managed through his skills involving information technology. He now studies a Science for Science and Innovation Policy to give administrative people and policy makers some evidences for Science and Technology policy. His current main task is policy implication of Open Science and Open Access, together with developing a new way to foresight ST trends. An expert member of the working party of Open Science for G7 Science and Technology Ministry meeting, also an expert member of the OECD/GSF project of Open Science.

Shigetoshi Kajiwara (Hokkaido University Library)

Since 2014 he has belonged to Hokkaido University Library (the main library). He is in charge of system administration in the academic system division, and responsible for library information system and network management and institutional repository. A member of SPARC Japan Seminar Planning WG in 2015 and 2016.

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Abstract
Open Science in a European Perspective
(Ron Dekker)

Open Science is high on the political agenda. During the Dutch Presidency of the European Council in 2016 the 28 Member States adopted Competitiveness Council Conclusions on Open Science, and there was a Presidency Conference on Open Science that resulted in the Amsterdam Call for Action on Open Science. The European Commission has set up a European Open Science Agenda and installed a number of Expert Groups on topics like Open ScienceCloud and Altmetrics. Several European countries have established national open science policies and strategies.
Other stakeholders, like universities, publishers, and funding organizations, are also elaborating on Open Science activities, including Citizen Science. At the same time, major changes in for example the ways of scholarly communication are hampered by first-mover disadvantages, or require major redistribution of means.
So where are we standing now? How could we induce change in the Open Science Ecosystem? How can we catalyse the transition to open access with respect to publishing? What would be needed to stimulate sharing of research data?
This talk will give a European overview, discuss these questions and open up for discussion on possible solutions. It will focus on publications and research data, although other aspects of open science and connecting science to society at large - including innovation - will also be touched upon.

Deep Learning and Open Science – Extreme Speed-up of Scientific Research Triggers Shift Toward Friction-Less Information Distribution
(Asanobu Kitamoto)

We have been studying the value of open science in three dimensions, namely utility, transparency and participation, but with difficulty in persuading others on how these values contribute directly to scientific research. Hence we introduce a new dimension called “speed” to re-consider the value of open science. A hypothesis behind this proposal is that when the speed of research becomes extremely high, information distribution is forced to follow the same speed, hence it evolves into a structure without “friction” that speeds down the distribution, and as a result, scientific research is directed toward openness. We claim that this hypothesis is best verified by the field of “deep learning,” which is part of artificial intelligence and machine learning. What is actually happening in this field? It is not clear how lessons from this exceptional field could be generalized, but we believe that the analysis of the movement in this field suggests one possible future of open science.

JST's Activity on the Promotion of the Open Science
(Yasushi Ogasaka)

Since JST announced its policy on open access to research article in 2013, JST has worked on the promotion of public access to and circulation of JST-funded research results. In addition to research articles, JST has been working on research data as well; JST hosted the 9th RDA Plenary Meeting in Tokyo in 2016 and data management plan (DMP) was introduced for some research projects funded by the Strategic Basic Research Programs. In this presentation, we report the current status of the activity on promotion of Open Science.

Using Data Licensing in Materials Science - a Library Viewpoint
(Chie Onodera)

Licensing is important for using data because data does not have copyright. I will present the concept of using data licensing based on three library seminars held by the National Institute for Materials Science in 2016. I will also introduce specific examples and discuss the role of libraries in licensing.

Idea, Reality and Feasibility of Research Data Sharing: the Survey on Earth Environmental Research Infrastructure
(Masafumi Ono)

Generally, research data sharing is a good idea to stimulate the advancement of science. This idea is also acceptable for most of stakeholders including researchers, policy makers, funders and citizens. But, it is the current reality that a lot of research data are not shared yet. Why we meet such gap between idea and reality of open science? Because we tried to reveal the barrier, we conducted a survey on earth environmental research infrastructure. We also propose some possible actions to enforce open science.

Survey and Planning of Information Services on Research Data
(Ikki Ohmukai)

National Institute of Informatics hosts a workshop for cooperative problem solving by librarians from various organizations. In this year, eight participants investigated and designed the information services for research data management. This presentation describes the outline, purpose and outcome of the workshop.

Group A: Planning of the "Institutional Research Information Integrated System (IRIIS)"
(Shunichi Tamura)

Our group constructed a system which enables an institution to easily manage its research information all together, and named it IRIIS (Institutional Research Information Integrated System). In the future, if the system becomes a standardized model and the widespread use, it is expected that more institutions can work on their research data management easily.

Group B: Planning of the "Open Data Enhancing Network system - ODEN"
(Shigetoshi Kajiwara)

As Group B, we suggested on idea to construct an open data metadata database which is called “Open Data Enhancing Network system - ODEN”. It enables us to search an open data on one-stop by centralizing metadata of scattered open data. In this presentation, we introduce the concept and outline.

Introduction to the RDM Training Tool Developed by the RDM Task Force of Institutional Repository Committee of Japan
(Koichi Ojiro)

In these days, world-wide research funding agencies have issued policies which require research data to be preserved and shared among researchers. In order to manage research data properly, not only researchers themselves but also supporting staff must learn skills regarding research data management. In this lecture, the RDM training tool developed by the task force of Institutional Repository Committee of Japan is introduced.

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Last Updated: 2017/03/10